"GOOD ARTISTS COPY, GREAT ARTISTS STEAL."

Interview with Steve Jobs (1994) about the creation of the Apple Macintosh. 

Using Crystals To Explore The Future Of Memories

Swarovski SMS Chandelier

Fifteen designers collaborated in the Digital Crystal: Swarovski exhibition at the Design Museum in London to question our relationship with the digital world.

Each designer responded to the brief in extremely different ways. Ron Arad created Lolita, (pictured above), a chandelier with over 2000 Swarovski crystals and 1000 white LEDs which converts the object into a giant interactive pixel board. The chandelier was originally created for Swarovski Crystal Place in 2004 but Arad has repurposed his creation to display tweets (#DigitalCrystal) and SMS messages.

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Play 3D Printed Vinyls on Fisher Price’s Toy Record Player

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Fisher-Price’s toy record player from the 1970s has gotten an update thanks to the fascinating world of 3D printing and the folks over at Instructables.

It’s easy to find the classic Fisher-Price record player online– but before, you were stuck listening to children’s songs like ‘Humpty Dumpty’ and ‘Twinkle-Twinkle Little Star’ on the device. Now, thanks to 3D printing, you can be your own music producer and create custom records to play on the iconic toy.

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THE RISE OF VISUAL SOCIAL MEDIA

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"Blogs were one of the earliest forms of social networking where people were writing 1,000 words. When we moved to status updates on Facebook, our posts became shorter. Then micro-blogs like Twitter came along and shortened our updates to 140 characters. Now we are even skipping words altogether and moving towards more visual communication with social-sharing sites like Pinterest."
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We’re living in an age of convergence and disruption, and one of the things being heavily disrupted is the passive role of the consumer to receive an ad message. It’s dead easy to simply ignore, block, filter ads at this point. So in order to thrive, advertisers have to go into the culture-making business — making original content that is so compelling that audiences seek it out.

One way to do that is overt storytelling — something far beyond a bunch of beautiful people sizing each other up around a pool to sell alcohol. There’s no narrative tension there. But there is some flat-out amazing storytelling in advertising already. There’s a powerful Nike ad going around right now, basically about a fat kid running, and it’s incredibly inspiring. That’s the right direction. Building on an emotional dynamic to tell a story that makes people feel and seek out more, that’s what transmedia is all about. 

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ARE YOU BUILDING FACEBOOK’S EMPIRE OR YOUR OWN?

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"What is the promise of the social web? It’s supposed to make our lives better."

This was a cause for celebration. New, democratizing technological tools combining with the established, powerful distribution and networks of established business meant that we could go further than ever before. However, instead of business adopting groundswell thinking, most businesses sought out the tools without the new attitude, seeing them more as a new, cheaper way to get to market rather than a better way to do business altogether. Fast forward to today where social means a Facebook page with millions of likes, a Twitter account with thousands of followers and scrambling to figure out how to integrate Instagram, Pinterest and fill-in-the-blank hot social network of the day.

This is not even close to the promise that social offers. Business interests and customer interests are pinned against one another. A few beloved brands can break through the noise and get attention and a few influential social media stars can get lots of freebies, but all-in-all, the everyday customer’s life is not being improved.

THE LEATHER KIDS

“I create images that evoke associations with people and animals. I imagine the balance between the many conflicting feelings and thoughts that a man can have. Balance between opposites as attractive / repulsive, happy / sad or fear / security. My pictures have something in them that causes you to think what to see and feel that it gives you, and then confirm again denied.” Sabi van Hemert

SCULPTURE TURNS INTO A BEATBOX AT OLYMPIC PARK

London architects, Asif Khan and Pernilla Ohrstedt have a created a musical collage of sporting sounds for a multi-sensory experience.

The interactive sculpture can be found at Coca-Cola’s Olympic Park pavilion, where visitors are invited to ‘Move to the Beat of London,’ by touching the structure.

The Coca-Cola Beatbox aims to connect young people to the Olympic and Paralympic Games by bringing together their passions for art, music, technology and sport.